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Meyer Lemon

Citrus meyerii
Year-round; most abundant in fall and spring

In History

This hardy member of the citrus family only arrived in the United States in 1908 when it was imported from China by Frank Meyer.

Cultivation

Growing Tips:
Lemons grow well in warmer climates and enjoy rich, moist soil.

Harvesting Tips:
Lemons grow well in warmer climates and enjoy rich, moist soil.

Why It's Good for You

This richly flavored lemon contains limonene, a type of flavonoid that has antioxidant properties that protect the immune system.

Did You Know

The Meyer Lemon is a thin-skinned, less acidic variety which is probably a cross between the lemon and either an orange or mandarin, with a distinctive flavor due to its thymol content.

Meyer lemons are believed to be a hybrid of mandarins and lemons.

Let's Eat

How to Buy:
Choose firm smooth lemons with brightly colored skins without any soft spots, punctures, or discoloration. Also look for lemons that are heavy for their size as it will insure a juicy interior

How to Store:
Choose firm smooth lemons with brightly colored skins without any soft spots, punctures, or discoloration. Also look for lemons that are heavy for their size as it will insure a juicy interior

How to Prepare:


 

Pest Management


Here is a list of common pests and diseases that may affect your lemon tree in California. For more information follow the link provided to the University of California Integrated Pest Management website.
  • Scales
    It is difficult to recognize these often immobile creatures as insects. They lose their legs just days after hatching and will firmly attach themselves to any plant surface where they pierce the plant and suck out its juices. Their plentiful honeydew attracts other pests and promotes mold growth, and in large infestations the damage can be devastating…
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  • Aphids
    In the early 19th century, the Phylloxera aphid wiped out the grape production throughout Western Europe. Aphids are extremely prolific, producing upwards of 20 generations in one season. They live in dense populations, and when living situations become too stressed they can flee by growing wings…
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  • Whiteflies
    The nymphs and adults extract juices from plant leaves, causing them to turn brown and curl. They prefer warm climates, and reproduce very quickly under appropriate weather conditions…
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  • Mealybugs
    The mealybug is attracted to trees, vines and shrubs where it is content to suck sap from the plant’s stems, leaves and shoots. They excrete honeydew and produce wax, which are difficult to remove from fruit…
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  • Citrus thrips
    Commonly found in gardens and on farms, thrips are a blessing and a burden. While their feeding can cause some scarring to leaves, flowers and fruit surfaces, the effect on overall crop yield is insignificant. Some varieties play a beneficial predatory role by feeding on other insects…
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  • Citrus cutworm
    Night-feeding larvae that burrow into the soil during the day make their presence known by severing plant stems and chomping away at the foliage and buds of just about any crop…
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  • Leafrollers
    Especially troublesome to fruit trees, leafrollers can cause serious damage to both leaves and fruit. Besides being eaten, leaves are rolled and tied up by silken threads to create shelter for the larvae, which can actually defoliate the tree…
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  • Citrus red mite
    These tiny arachnids can be hard to detect, and may go not even be noticed until they have left! There are different varieties of mites, and they are a common pest to a wide range of vegetables and fruits. They suck the liquid out of plant foliage, and often leave yellowing at the feeding site. Often, plants will recover once the mites have left…
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