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Tomato Troubles: BLOSSOM END ROT

July 14th, 2010


Tomato blossom end rot is annoying to say the least, but fear not! You are not the only one who has this issue!

Today’s entry is an answer for Kate, one of our beloved fans, and addresses the problem that she is having with her tomatoes. Above you will see a photo of her poor tomato. Most of her tomatoes have a hard brownness at their ends. Kate has correctly identified the issue as a lack of calcium, but wants to know what it is and how she can fix it.

First of all, it looks to me like you have a classic case of tomato blossom end rot. The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources describes the problem in detail in their free publication “Growing Tomatoes in the Home Garden:”

Problem

  • Water-soaked spot on blossom end of fruit enlarges and darkens, becomes sunken and leathery. Affects both the green and ripe fruit, and is more common in sandier soils.

Probable Cause

  • Calcium nutrition and water balance in the plant, aggravated by high soil salt content and fluctuating soil moisture.

Control

  • Maintain even soil moisture
  • Amend planting area with organic matter such as compost to improve water retention.
  • Avoid heavy applications of high-nitrogen fertilizer.
  • Soils that are deficient in calcium may be amended with gypsum.

Kate, for some reason I remember that you were concerned about the sandy soil where you planted your garden. If this is the case try amending your soil with gypsum which you can obtain at most nurseries. The packaging will let you know how much to add. Also try to be sure to maintain even soil moisture. If you are concerned that the soil around your tomatoes is not evenly moist then add some compost around your plants to improve the water retention. (On a side note, what is that black and white enamel(?) background on which you took this photo? It looks so cool and vintage!)

Does anyone else have some suggestions? Have you ever added gypsum to remedy this kind of problem in your home garden? How did you do it and what were the results?

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Great Gardening Resource: CALIFORNIA GARDENING Advice to Grow By

April 28th, 2010

Starting and maintaining a productive edible home garden is not easy! It takes time and patience because something unexpected always throws a wrench into the most well-laid plans.

Where do you go for help? Here is a fantastic resource to answer a huge variety of your gardening questions for those of you who live and garden in California: California Gardening–Advice to Grow By. On this site you will find tons of useful information ranging from “Gardening Basics” to “Poisonous Plants.” There’s even a link to to help you find a local master gardener as well as a list of upcoming classes and events.

This site is a service of the University of California Cooperative Extension. (If you don’t live in California, just google your state name, “gardening” and “cooperative extension.” The plethora of information they offer will blow your mind!)

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