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Ready, Set, Grow

It may seems like months away but your winter vegetable garden needs attention now! In the Fall 2010 edition of The Yolo Gardener, Peg Smith, Yolo County Master Gardener, wrote a great article on getting ready for winter vegetable gardening. Click here to read the full article.

Although August is harvesting time for tomatoes and zucchinis, it is also the time to start planning for your winter vegetable garden.

READY- Soil Preparation

Anytime you remove a plant or prepare new soil for a vegetable bed, you have an opportunity to improve the tilth of your soil. Many parts of the Sacramento surrounding area deal with the good and the bad of clay soil.

Clay soils are nutrient rich but compact easily, acting like a bog when wet and cement when dry. Adding compost will improve a plants ability to survive in any soil condition.

SET- Right Plant, Right Time

The winter garden must-have is the Brassica family, which is the only vegetable family to have edible varieties developed from all plant parts.

  • Broccoli is considered a flower
  • Cabbage is considered leaves
  • Turnips/Radishes are considered roots
  • Rapeseed oil is derived from seeds

Use this chart to help you plant the Brassica family at the right times:

Interested in vegetables that aren’t in the Brassica family? Other vegetable varieties that will do well in the winter are fava beans and peas.

Both of which are legumes that have rhizobia bacteria in their root nodules. These bacteria are important because they produce nitrogen compounds essential for plant growth. When the plants die, the nitrogen is released which enriches the soil for subsequent plantings.

Consider rotating legumes around your garden to increase the health of the soil in various areas.

Use this chart to help you plant legumes and other winter vegetables at the right times:

GROW- Watering Wisely

Young transplants need a moist soil but not an over saturated soil. Also seedlings should never show signs of wilting because that means they are dried out. Young transplants will need some temporarily created shade if there is unseasonably warm weather. This can be as easy as using an old bed sheet pinned up to a fence.

As the seeds develop and mature, you can encourage strong root penetration by watering deeply and then allowing the surface soil to dry before deep soaking again.

Once the winter rain begins you will only need to water during the drier weeks of winter.

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